*Metaphysics : The branch of philosophy dealing with first principles, including abstract concepts like being, knowing, substance, cause, identity, time, and space.

David Raffin is a Metaphysicist*, Post-Humorist, & Performer.

What people are saying about David:



The Daily Olympian

"He’s not your average comedian."

The Daily News

"David Raffin is hilarious."

The Northwest Examiner

"A cross between Garrison Keillor and Salvador Dali."

Jodi Lamm, Author  Titan Magic   (Her Site)

"His perversions are oddly analytical."

Peter Bacho, Author  Cebu | Dark Blue Suit

"Intelligent, Humorous, and highly imaginative– always a pleasure to read."

Larry Ziak, KMUN

"I nearly choked on my breakfast from laughing so hard."

Haunted Eyeball

"Attic Dog by David Raffin [is] Wonderfully sad and very strange. Creates a beautifully desolate atmosphere of dust-strewn, forgotten spaces and the creeping, lonely decay of a long abandoned toy."

Ian Krauss, Performance Artist

"Strange and enlightening."

Evergreen State College

“The amalgam of fantasy and realism, of fantastic plot turns... Is both puzzling and engaging. David's mode of storytelling precludes the need for context. Instead, his stories are an opportunity for readers to question their assumptions about cause and effect, structure, form, resolution–all the traditional conventions of plot and character. The absurdist form is supposed to be disruptive. Certainly, David is a virtuoso at not delivering what an audience might expect. As such, he shows his remarkable skills as a satirist."  (*)

About Vision? Nary! Magazine:

Excite

"A source of hip, high quality, entertainment... Vision? Nary! is...well...you'll have to figure it out for yourself. Great content and style throughout."

MAXIMUMROCKNROLL

"A sarcastic, funny magazine that takes it to you with humor about the general fucked-up-ness of America- down home heartland America"

Factsheet 5

"Compared to all the other "Gen-X" magazines coming out these days, this one strikes me as the genuine article. Not that they label themselves as such.... it's just that the writing, the attitude and the style of this publication seems like it comes from the heart of the struggle of people in their 20s.

An intro to the fine art of hitchhiking; how to turn international strife into profitable ventures; theories about the invention of property; techniques for trapping wives; and the mathematical analysis of failing morale in the workplace."

Joe Bob Report (Joe Bob Briggs)
  

"A smart new magazine... filled with commentary, humor, short fiction, cartoons and reviews from various contributing writers and artists... We love Raffin's introduction."

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(*) Full review from above:

"These scripts only begin to represent the rate which David hatches ideas; his mind is a storm of activity.

One of the problems that confronts David is translating his sometimes bizarre ideas into the necessarily concrete world of visual media. In Fact, David's style is absurdist bordering on the surreal. His protagonists are typically haunted... Or plagued by real but unbelievable companions. In "Bare Necessities," an almost life-sized wheelchair-bound stuffed polar bear is taken to collect Social Security benefits. The Bears caretaker is completely unaware of his situation, its absurdity and strangeness. Contained within the story is an emergent social criticism, typical of absurdist storytelling. The point is that the validity of one's existence and affective commitments are judged via institutional forms that don't grant leeway for imaginative excess of subjective truths. The overall bizarreness of his creative sensibility works to effect shock in his audience- shock and perhaps self-recognition.

In his story "Outcast," he creates a character who's imaginary friend achieves more social recognition and success than the character himself. Nick, the projection of the main characters imagination, becomes almost completely independent of its creative source. In this case, the story does not venture into larger social issues, but remains instead on the level of psychodrama. The point seems to be a commentary of the dissociative tendencies of creator and creation.

In "Everyone loves a little Elf," David recast the fairy tale, "The shoemaker and the elves," as a contemporary drama about the commodification of Labor and the public's proprietary relationship to ideas. In this case, the "Shoemaker" discovers the marketability of pheromones contained in elf sweat, a commodity that serves consumers desire to be more sexually attractive. The fact that the elf sweat is obnoxious and overwhelmingly putrid casts a certain Pall over the discovery of its utility. When Santa Claus shows up to reclaim his renegade elves, a debate ensues about intellectual property rights and slave labor; a debate that points, at least indirectly, at the flaws inherent in an economic system that is driven by desire but regulated and dominated by systems of investment and power.

In "Free Will in the Jungle," David achieves some of his most biting satire, this time focusing on the life of a college professor who teaches philosophy to students who are wholly embedded in identity politics or their own unteachable solopsisms. The classroom scenes are laugh-out-loud funny, painfully so, as the topic of free will, in its historic, religious, and philosophical dimensions, is reduced to banter about whether hypotheticals are gender biased. The college professor's sardonic attempts to battle back the forces of self-righteous ignorance are to no avail. He knows this and taunts them with less taxing problems such as toilet-seat up or toilet-seat down--yet another example that gets trashed in the machinery of simple minded dogma. David juxtaposes this contemporary scene with a story that is set in the jungle, where European military blokes are training monkeys to fight Nazis. The link between the settings is made implicitly as the college professor discusses with one of his brilliant dropouts the notion that Neanderthals were more intelligent than Homo Sapiens because they successfully failed to join the march of progress. The more primitive human forms were morally superior because they didn't meddle in abstract schemes or use the lever of technology to disfigure their surroundings. The dialogue in this piece is truly funny and smart as it works to unveil the folly of contemporary enthusiasms.

The amalgam of fantasy and realism, of fantastic plot turns... Is both puzzling and engaging. David's mode of storytelling precludes the need for context. Instead, his stories are an opportunity for readers to question their assumptions about cause and effect, structure, form, resolution--all the traditional conventions of plot and character. The absurdist form is supposed to be disruptive. Certainly, David is a virtuoso at not delivering what an audience might expect. As such, he shows his remarkable skills as a satirist."

– Evergreen State College

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